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The Books

Essential books for study

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Paths to Climb the Mountain

You can choose to Learn in a modular way by taking individual courses or You can apprentice.

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Mountain University

Mountains are the ancient and original places of higher learning. You learn on your journey (referred to in many traditions as the The Way) up the mountain and you learn when you have reached your destination. Whether you seek a place for quiet contemplation, commune with nature, or guidance from the divine mountains have always been sought for the laboratory  for such work. In places where mountains were not an option, the ancient ones created mounds, ziggurats, pyramids, and temples. There are sacred mountain places in all traditions and all countries.

In the Chinese Five Metaphysical Arts - Mountain ( ) is the branch devoted to the Philosophical arts, cultivation, martial arts, self-healing, meditation which covers the thoughts and teaching of Ancient Chinese philosophers or sages. This is also include the study of, whereby in the ancient time, one will need to go up to the mountain to receive such knowledge through meditation or cultivation.

It is in these traditions that Mountain University carries on this function in the present and digital world. The world needs a new generation of Scholar-Warrior-Sages, Renaissance Men/Women. If you feel the calling, start today because tomorrow is not guaranteed.

Chapter 59 Guarding the Dao

治人事天莫若嗇。夫唯嗇,是謂早服;早服謂之重積德;重積德則無不克;無不克則莫知其極;莫知其極,可以有國;有國之母,可以長久;是謂深根固柢,長生久視之道。 1. For regulating the human (in our constitution) and rendering the (proper) service to the heavenly, there is nothing like moderation. 2. It is only by this moderation that there is effected an early return (to man’s normal state). That early return is what I call the repeated accumulation of the attributes (of the […]

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Chapter 4 The fountainless

道沖而用之或不盈。淵兮似萬物之宗。挫其銳,解其紛,和其光,同其塵。湛兮似或存。吾不知誰之子,象帝之先。 1. The Tao is (like) the emptiness of a vessel; and in our employment of it we must be on our guard against all fulness. How deep and unfathomable it is, as if it were the Honoured Ancestor of all things! 2. We should blunt our sharp points, and unravel the complications of things; […]

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Chapter 24 Painful graciousness

企者不立;跨者不行;自見者不明;自是者不彰;自伐者無功;自矜者不長。其在道也,曰:餘食贅行。物或惡之,故有道者不處。 He who stands on his tiptoes does not stand firm; he who stretches his legs does not walk (easily). (So), he who displays himself does not shine; he who asserts his own views is not distinguished; he who vaunts himself does not find his merit acknowledged; he who is self- conceited has no superiority […]

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Chapter 48 Forgetting Knowledge

為學日益,為道日損。損之又損,以至於無為。無為而無不為。取天下常以無事,及其有事,不足以取天下。 1. He who devotes himself to learning (seeks) from day to day to increase (his knowledge); he who devotes himself to the Tao (seeks) from day to day to diminish (his doing). 2. He diminishes it and again diminishes it, till he arrives at doing nothing (on purpose). Having arrived at this point of […]

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Chapter 76 A warning against (trusting in) strength

人之生也柔弱,其死也堅強。萬物草木之生也柔脆,其死也枯槁。故堅強者死之徒,柔弱者生之徒。是以兵強則不勝,木強則共。強大處下,柔弱處上。 1. Man at his birth is supple and weak; at his death, firm and strong. (So it is with) all things. Trees and plants, in their early growth, are soft and brittle; at their death, dry and withered. 2. Thus it is that firmness and strength are the concomitants of death; softness and weakness, […]

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Chapter 63 Thinking in the beginning

為無為,事無事,味無味。大小多少,報怨以德。圖難於其易,為大於其細;天下難事,必作於易,天下大事,必作於細。是以聖人終不為大,故能成其大。夫輕諾必寡信,多易必多難。是以聖人猶難之,故終無難矣。 1. (It is the way of the Dao) to act without (thinking of) acting; to conduct affairs without (feeling the) trouble of them; to taste without discerning any flavor; to consider what is small as great, and a few as many; and to recompense injury with kindness. 2. (The master of it) anticipates things […]

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Sun Tzu on The Art of War

SUN TZU ON THE ART OF WAR THE OLDEST MILITARY TREATISE IN THE WORLD Translated from the Chinese By LIONEL GILES, M.A. (1910)       [This is the basic text of Sun Tzu on the Art of War. It was extracted from Mr. Giles’ complete work as titled above. The commentary itself, which, of […]

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III. ATTACK BY STRATAGEM

III. ATTACK BY STRATAGEM 1. Sun Tzu said: In the practical art of war, the best thing of all is to take the enemy’s country whole and intact; to shatter and destroy it is not so good. So, too, it is better to recapture an army entire than to destroy it, to capture a regiment, […]

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Chinese Herb Prefixes

  Pin Yin Preparation Example Xian Fresh, Juicy Xian Lu Gen, Xian Huo Xiang Sheng Raw, Uncooked Sheng Gan Cao, Sheng Di Huang Chao Toasted, Dry Fried Chao Bai Zhu, Chao Mai Ya Zhi Honey Fried Zhi Gan Cao, Zhi Huang Qi Zhi Steamed Zhi Da Huang, Zhi Shou Wu Jiao Charred, Over Cooked Jiao […]

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Chapter 64 Guarding the minute

其安易持,其未兆易謀。其脆易泮,其微易散。為之於未有,治之於未亂。合抱之木, 生於毫末;九層之臺,起於累土;千里之行,始於足下。為者敗之,執者失之。是以聖人無為故無敗;無執故無失。民之從事,常於幾成而敗之。慎終如始,則無敗 事,是以聖人欲不欲,不貴難得之貨;學不學,復衆人之所過,以輔萬物之自然,而不敢為。 1. That which is at rest is easily kept hold of; before a thing has given indications of its presence, it is easy to take measures against it; that which is brittle is easily broken; that which is very small is easily dispersed. Action should be taken before a thing has made […]

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