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The Books

Essential books for study

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Paths to Climb the Mountain

You can choose to Learn in a modular way by taking individual courses or You can apprentice.

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Mountain University

Mountains are the ancient and original places of higher learning. You learn on your journey (referred to in many traditions as the The Way) up the mountain and you learn when you have reached your destination. Whether you seek a place for quiet contemplation, commune with nature, or guidance from the divine mountains have always been sought for the laboratory  for such work. In places where mountains were not an option, the ancient ones created mounds, ziggurats, pyramids, and temples. There are sacred mountain places in all traditions and all countries.

In the Chinese Five Metaphysical Arts - Mountain ( ) is the branch devoted to the Philosophical arts, cultivation, martial arts, self-healing, meditation which covers the thoughts and teaching of Ancient Chinese philosophers or sages. This is also include the study of, whereby in the ancient time, one will need to go up to the mountain to receive such knowledge through meditation or cultivation.

It is in these traditions that Mountain University carries on this function in the present and digital world. The world needs a new generation of Scholar-Warrior-Sages, Renaissance Men/Women. If you feel the calling, start today because tomorrow is not guaranteed.

Chapter 81 The manifestation of simplicity

信言不美,美言不信。善者不辯,辯者不善。知者不博,博者不知。聖人不積,既以為人己愈有,既以與人己愈多。天之道,利而不害;聖人之道,為而不爭。 1. Sincere words are not fine; fine words are not sincere. Those who are skilled (in the Tao) do not dispute (about it); the disputatious are not skilled in it. Those who know (the Tao) are not extensively learned; the extensively learned do not know it. 2. The sage does not accumulate (for himself). […]

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Chapter 12 The repression of the desires

五色令人目盲;五音令人耳聾;五味令人口爽;馳騁田獵,令人心發狂;難得之貨,令人行妨。是以聖人為腹不為目,故去彼取此 1. Color’s five hues from th’ eyes their sight will take; Music’s five notes the ears as deaf can make; The flavors five deprive the mouth of taste; The chariot course, and the wild hunting waste Make mad the mind; and objects rare and strange, Sought for, men’s conduct will to evil change. 2. […]

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IV. TACTICAL DISPOSITIONS

IV. TACTICAL DISPOSITIONS 1. Sun Tzu said: The good fighters of old first put themselves beyond the possibility of defeat, and then waited for an opportunity of defeating the enemy. 2. To secure ourselves against defeat lies in our own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself. 3. […]

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Taiji Lun

Taiji, born of Wuji, is the potential for either dong (movement, dynamic) or jing (stillness, static). It is the mother ( the source) of yin and yang. In dong (movement) yin and yang tend to fen (become separate and distinct), in jing (stillness) yin and yang tend to he (unite to become one). Neither overextend […]

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Chapter 72 Loving one’s self

民不畏威,則大威至。無狎其所居,無厭其所生。夫唯不厭,是以不厭。是以聖人自知不自見;自愛不自貴。故去彼取此。 1. When the people do not fear what they ought to fear, that which is their great dread will come on them. 2. Let them not thoughtlessly indulge themselves in their ordinary life; let them not act as if weary of what that life depends on. 3. It is by avoiding such indulgence that […]

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Chapter 45 Great or overflowing virtue

大成若缺,其用不弊。大盈若沖,其用不窮。大直若屈,大巧若拙,大辯若訥。躁勝寒靜勝熱。清靜為天下正。 1. Who thinks his great achievements poor Shall find his vigour long endure. Of greatest fulness, deemed a void, Exhaustion ne’er shall stem the tide. Do thou what’s straight still crooked deem; Thy greatest art still stupid seem, And eloquence a stammering scream. 2. Constant action overcomes cold; being still overcomes heat. Purity and […]

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Chapter 26 The quality of gravity

重為輕根,靜為躁君。是以聖人終日行不離輜重。雖有榮觀,燕處超然。奈何萬乘之主,而以身輕天下?輕則失本,躁則失君。 1. Gravity is the root of lightness; stillness, the ruler of movement. 2. Therefore a wise prince, marching the whole day, does not go far from his baggage wagons. Although he may have brilliant prospects to look at, he quietly remains (in his proper place), indifferent to them. How should the lord of a […]

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IX. THE ARMY ON THE MARCH

IX. THE ARMY ON THE MARCH 1. Sun Tzu said: We come now to the question of encamping the army, and observing signs of the enemy. Pass quickly over mountains, and keep in the neighborhood of valleys. 2. Camp in high places, facing the sun. Do not climb heights in order to fight. So much […]

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Chapter 24 Painful graciousness

企者不立;跨者不行;自見者不明;自是者不彰;自伐者無功;自矜者不長。其在道也,曰:餘食贅行。物或惡之,故有道者不處。 He who stands on his tiptoes does not stand firm; he who stretches his legs does not walk (easily). (So), he who displays himself does not shine; he who asserts his own views is not distinguished; he who vaunts himself does not find his merit acknowledged; he who is self- conceited has no superiority […]

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salt and water

Take a small pinch of salt (preferably pink Himalayan salt) at night before bed with a glass of water. This practice helps keep you hydrated while you sleep. The salt helps you retain water in your circulatory system to combat the loss of moisture from respiration when asleep. The salt also provides many needed trace […]

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