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The Books

Essential books for study

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Paths to Climb the Mountain

You can choose to Learn in a modular way by taking individual courses or You can apprentice.

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Mountain University

Mountains are the ancient and original places of higher learning. You learn on your journey (referred to in many traditions as the The Way) up the mountain and you learn when you have reached your destination. Whether you seek a place for quiet contemplation, commune with nature, or guidance from the divine mountains have always been sought for the laboratory  for such work. In places where mountains were not an option, the ancient ones created mounds, ziggurats, pyramids, and temples. There are sacred mountain places in all traditions and all countries.

In the Chinese Five Metaphysical Arts - Mountain ( ) is the branch devoted to the Philosophical arts, cultivation, martial arts, self-healing, meditation which covers the thoughts and teaching of Ancient Chinese philosophers or sages. This is also include the study of, whereby in the ancient time, one will need to go up to the mountain to receive such knowledge through meditation or cultivation.

It is in these traditions that Mountain University carries on this function in the present and digital world. The world needs a new generation of Scholar-Warrior-Sages, Renaissance Men/Women. If you feel the calling, start today because tomorrow is not guaranteed.

Sun Tzu on The Art of War

SUN TZU ON THE ART OF WAR THE OLDEST MILITARY TREATISE IN THE WORLD Translated from the Chinese By LIONEL GILES, M.A. (1910)       [This is the basic text of Sun Tzu on the Art of War. It was extracted from Mr. Giles’ complete work as titled above. The commentary itself, which, of […]

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Chapter 21 The empty heart, or the Dao in its operation

孔德之容,唯道是從。道之為物,唯恍唯惚。忽兮恍兮,其中有象;恍兮忽兮,其中有物。窈兮冥兮,其中有精;其精甚真,其中有信。自古及今,其名不去,以閱衆甫。吾何以知衆甫之狀哉?以此。 21. The grandest forms of active force From Tao come, their only source. Who can of Tao the nature tell? Our sight it flies, our touch as well. Eluding sight, eluding touch, The forms of things all in it crouch; Eluding touch, eluding sight, There are their semblances, all right. Profound it is, dark […]

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Wind – Feng

http://www.itmonline.org/articles/feng/feng.htmITM Home Page | Article IndexFENG: The Meaning of Wind in Chinese Medicinewith special attention to acupoint fengchi (GB-20)by Subhuti Dharmananda, Ph.D., Director, Institute for Traditional Medicine, Portland, OregonA term in the field of traditional Chinese medicine that causes considerable difficulty for modern practitioners is wind (feng).  It is known as:one of the six external […]

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Chapter 4 The fountainless

道沖而用之或不盈。淵兮似萬物之宗。挫其銳,解其紛,和其光,同其塵。湛兮似或存。吾不知誰之子,象帝之先。 1. The Tao is (like) the emptiness of a vessel; and in our employment of it we must be on our guard against all fulness. How deep and unfathomable it is, as if it were the Honoured Ancestor of all things! 2. We should blunt our sharp points, and unravel the complications of things; […]

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Taiji Lun

Taiji, born of Wuji, is the potential for either dong (movement, dynamic) or jing (stillness, static). It is the mother ( the source) of yin and yang. In dong (movement) yin and yang tend to fen (become separate and distinct), in jing (stillness) yin and yang tend to he (unite to become one). Neither overextend […]

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Chapter 8 The placid and contented nature

上善若水。水善利萬物而不爭,處衆人之所惡,故幾於道。居善地,心善淵,與善仁,言善信,正善治,事善能,動善時。夫唯不爭,故無尤。 1. The highest excellence is like (that of) water. The excellence of water appears in its benefiting all things, and in its occupying, without striving (to the contrary), the low place which all men dislike. Hence (its way) is near to (that of) the Tao. 2. The excellence of a residence is in (the […]

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Chapter 24 Painful graciousness

企者不立;跨者不行;自見者不明;自是者不彰;自伐者無功;自矜者不長。其在道也,曰:餘食贅行。物或惡之,故有道者不處。 He who stands on his tiptoes does not stand firm; he who stretches his legs does not walk (easily). (So), he who displays himself does not shine; he who asserts his own views is not distinguished; he who vaunts himself does not find his merit acknowledged; he who is self- conceited has no superiority […]

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Chapter 76 A warning against (trusting in) strength

人之生也柔弱,其死也堅強。萬物草木之生也柔脆,其死也枯槁。故堅強者死之徒,柔弱者生之徒。是以兵強則不勝,木強則共。強大處下,柔弱處上。 1. Man at his birth is supple and weak; at his death, firm and strong. (So it is with) all things. Trees and plants, in their early growth, are soft and brittle; at their death, dry and withered. 2. Thus it is that firmness and strength are the concomitants of death; softness and weakness, […]

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Chapter 5 The use of emptiness

天地不仁,以萬物為芻狗;聖人不仁,以百姓為芻狗。天地之間,其猶橐籥乎?虛而不屈,動而愈出。多言數窮,不如守中。 1. Heaven and earth do not act from (the impulse of) any wish to be benevolent; they deal with all things as the dogs of grass are dealt with. The sages do not act from (any wish to be) benevolent; they deal with the people as the dogs of grass are dealt with. 2. […]

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